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Dec 21

Review: Shadowrun 2050

Shadowrun2050CoverPreviewShadowrun 2050 is tagged as an historical setting book for Shadowrun 4th edition, with the aim of allowing GM’s to run 4th edition games in the world originally presented by the 1st edition rules. The book is split into 8 main sections, the first 5 of which cover world background while the last three are more focused more upon the game system itself. As with most Shadowrun products there are also a number of short stories spread throughout the book. Before I continue I want to highlight the two primary aspects which heavily influenced my purchase of this book.

1. Shadowrun 4th edition is, in many ways, not cyberpunk; the setting has moved on to that of post-cyberpunk. It’s had to due to the continuous timeline, which has progressed progressed by over 20 years since first edition. In turn the technology of the game has also developed, most notably through the introduction of the wireless matrix and augmented reality. As a friend of mine would say, “it’s not cyberpunk if you don’t plug a keyboard into your head”. Shadowrun 2050, therefore, appealed to the purist in me, the one that wants to be able to play in a classic setting while using the latest ruleset. Don’t get me wrong, I enjoy the post-cyberpunk setting as well, but it’s the classic 80s cyberpunk that inspired me to buy this book.

2. I am not a veteran of Shadowrun, I haven’t played previous editions and don’t have access to a library of old sourcebooks or adventures. I’d hoped that this book would make up for that, providing the details and flavour needed to run a classic game of Shadowrun.

World Background

The first five sections of the book concern world background information, aimed at providing the flavour needed to run a game in the 2050 setting and are presented in the form of matrix posts made by prominent Shadowrunners of the period. Briefly, these sections introduce some background on the major Corp’s and gangs, influential individuals, a breakdown of three major locations (Seattle, Chicago and Hong Kong), the types of jobs available and some sample characters before finishing up on a short ‘Life in 2050.’ While these sections (and accompanying fiction) take up around three quarters of the book they are annoyingly short on substance. Each of the topics are presented as the not much more than the briefest of introductions and with no comparison to how they differ from that of the 2070s, which is the default setting for the 4th edition rules. This is especially frustrating during the section on the types of jobs available, as by and large this hasn’t changed between editions. In contrast details on how these jobs differ between the periods, such as the types of security present or how to give NPCs a 2050′s flavour are absent.

Magic, hacking and gear

The final quarter of the book focuses more upon the system, introducing changes to magic and the matrix that fit better with the original 1st edition material. The magic chapter covers the three major traditions of the time, Shamanic, Hermetic and Buddhist, introducing tweaks to the spell categories available to each as well as reintroducing rules for grounding spells (affecting the physical world while in astral space) that were present in earlier editions of the game. Following this the matrix chapter returns hacking to its roots, detailing cyberdecks and the nodal structure of networks in the 2050′s. Common programs, IC and actions which can be taken in the matrix are also covered by this chapter with enough detail to be of actual use when playing the game. Bringing the book to a close is a fair sized gear chapter, listing the sort of equipment that would have been available to runners at the time, which includes bio- and cyberware (which, in my opinion, could have easily had a chapter to itself).

Summary

All in all this book was quite disappointing and appears to have been written to appeal to Shadowrun veterans who are nostalgic for the older editions. The background provided on the 2050s feels like somebody has merely summarised the setting and adventures from 1st edition without bothering to focus on any details of the period or how it differs from the default setting of 4th edition.If each section had included a ‘How this differs from the 2070s’ or ‘Using [faction X] in your game’ I’d be tempted to think more highly of the book, as it stands however the only sections I’m ever likely to refer to are those relating to the system changes, a mere quarter of the total page count.

Final rating: 2 out of 5

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  1. Review: Shadowrun 2050 | LunarShadow.net

    [...] This was originally published on the Nearly Enough Dice blog at http://nearlyenoughdice.com/review-shadowrun-2050 [...]

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